I feel fortunate to have been given the opportunity to teach a variety of levels for Qkids since starting in April. I am always amazed at how smart and enthusiastic about learning the students are. Their energy is infectious, and I always find myself having a great time. Even if there are times when classes may not go the way I expect, it’s still very rewarding. Teaching for Qkids doesn’t even feel like a job. It is so much fun.

Recently, I’ve been teaching a lot of upper level classes, and thought I’d share some tips and suggestions for how to extend a lesson if there is time left over in class. We definitely still want to be high energy, enthusiastic, and TPR our hearts out but I think the intensity in which we do those things can be toned down just a little bit for upper level students.

Many lessons at the beginning (e.g. L1-3) have at least 20 slides of material to review, whereas, the upper levels may only have 11-13 slides.  What happens if students breeze through the material and there is still 10 minutes left of class time??

Fear not, here are some suggestions to fill time:

1. Review previous slides; play games more than once.

2. Ask extension questions during animation tasks, stories or any slide really, such as:

                -What else do you see?

                -What do you think they’re going to do?

                -How do they feel?

                -A lot of who, what, where, when, why and how questions! 🙂

3. If there are role play slides, it usually follows a question/answer type format so what you can do is have each student have a turn to ask and answer the same question. For example:

-Select student 1 to ask the first question, select student 2 to answer the question and THEN you switch their roles for the same question. (Hope that makes sense.)

4. Ask review questions during the last slide before the leaderboard (it’s a great way to evaluate what the students have learned too):

-ask students to tell you what vocabulary words and/or concepts they learned during the lesson and list them out using the text box tool

-ask students to describe words and/or give meaning to words (e.g. what does ______ mean? )

– ask students to make sentences using words/concepts they learned during the lesson.

– ask the students to summarize the lesson if not already completed during the class (e.g. free talk topic).[ For the upper levels, the lessons usually follow a story so you can ask students what’s happened so far and what they think will happen next. ]

5. Play other word games, such as:

  -guessing games using vocabulary words and/or concepts from the lesson (e.g. hangman game)

-Pictionary -type game, where students try to guess what you’re drawing

-I once drew a whole scene out on a whiteboard, and had the students guess or narrate the story, but a picture is cool too! J

-many teachers have suggested tic-tac-toe using vocabulary words OR

-word scramble- where you mix up the letters of a vocabulary word and have the students try to unscramble and guess the word.

NOTE: The text box tool works great for these activities!

Alright, so…these are just some of the things that I’ve tried with upper levels so far, but these can also be used for any level. I am hoping that they are helpful to you.

Thanks for reading AND Happy Teaching!

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